Press Releases About Extant Pterosaurs

A number of press releases have been published, over several years, on eyewitness accounts of featherless flying creatures described like pterosaurs or “pterodactyls.” Other press releases are about compiled information from a number of sightings, and this includes declarations that certain statistics prove that no significant number of hoaxes could have been involved, overall, in the many sighting reports analyzed.

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Live Pterosaur in Georgia?

This news release includes ideas about sightings by eyewitnesses David Schroder, Sandra Paradise, and anonymous persons in Georgia. The creatures observed may be related to the “Gitmo Pterosaur” of Cuba.

No Hoaxes With Pterosaur Sightings Overall

Three factors are examined: eyewitness estimates of wingspan, degree of certainty on featherless appearance, and the dominance of reports of long tails.

Reports of Living Pterosaurs

Pterosaurs, commonly called “pterodactyls,” live in various parts of the world, according to Jonathan Whitcomb, of Long Beach, California. He has written three nonfiction books, based on eyewitness reports . . .

Do Tales of Dracula Come From an Animal?

“The longer we watched, the more spooked we became. It was as though a giant vampire bat (like Dracula-style) was there . . .”

Extinct or not, That is the Question About Pterosaurs

“Not everybody embraces living pterosaurs.” Combined against the idea that some pterosaurs are non-extinct are the large newspaper Houston Chronicle, a Smithsonian blog post, and a distinguished English paleontologist.

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Pterosaur Tail Vane or Flange

Among scientists, the word “vane” is used for that structure (on pterosaur fossils) at the end of many of the long tails, although some use the word “flange.” [blog post, not a news release]

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About Jonathan Whitcomb

Jonathan David Whitcomb, of Murray, Utah, (formerly of Long Beach, California) has written four nonfiction cryptozoology books (nine total editions), each one about eyewitness reports of living pterosaurs.
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